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Best Hiking Trails Across Canada

hiking trail forest

It’s always hiking season and as adventure seekers ourselves, we complied a list of the best hikes across Canada to conquer before the summer is over. From easy to intense, there’s a trail here for everyone. What are you waiting for? Grab a bottle of water, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover.


Alberta – Banff National Park

With one of the largest provincial parks in the country, there are over 1,600 km of trails varying intensities throughout the park – and the views are spectacular. It’s a popular tourist spot in Alberta, boasting beautiful mountain peaks, turquoise waters, and breathtaking scenery at every turn. Because there are quite a few trails, we’ve found two in varying levels of difficulty:

Easy: Lake Agnes Teahouse/Big Beehive
Time Required: 3-4 hours
Distance: 7.2 km return trip

Challenging: Cory Pass – Mt. Edith Circuit
Time Required: 5-6 hours
Distance: 13 km loop

British Columbia – The West Coast Trail, Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island’s West Coast Trail is one of the most scenic hikes in all of Canada. While it’s 75 km path weaves through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, you can take a 6-day trek or a quick hike. The trail was originally carved out to help shipwreck survivors escape from the wilderness. The trail itself offers camping if you’re looking to do the entire trek, or just enjoy an escape in the middle of the forest.

Ontario – Bruce Peninsula National Park

Bruce Peninsula National Park is home to Canada’s oldest and longest footpath spanning 750 km, running from Tobermory to Niagara Falls. The Niagara Escarpment is the backbone of the Bruce Peninsula, creating an amazing, unique landscape – it’s even part of the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. There are many hiking trails within the park, varying in all levels of difficulty and distances:

Easy: Cyprus Lake Trail
Time Required: 2.5 hours
Distance: 5km

Challenging (varies from low difficulty to moderate when approaching Grotto): Marr Lake Trail to Indian Head Cove and the Grotto
Time Required: 3 hours
Distance: 3km

Ontario – Algonquin National Park

Algonquin National Park is located approximately 3 hours from Toronto and is one and a half times the size of Prince Edward Island. By saying that there is something for everyone is quite an understatement. You can take a weekend-long camping trip or hike one of the day trails within the park. If you adventure rural enough, you can spot moose grazing, bald eagle sightings, and many more. The park includes guided walks, canoeing, and birdwatching.

Newfoundland – Gros Morne National Park

Another UNESCO World Heritage site in Canada, this park offers some of the most astounding views in the country. With soaring fjords, topography and mountains, you’ll feel like you’re in Lord of The Rings – it’s Tablelands area is one of the few places in the world where you can see the Earth’s mantle. There are countless trails that are fairly easy to hike, but those seeking adventure and amazing views will take the more challenging routes in.

Quebec – Parc National de Mont-Tremblant

Canadian’s and tourists alike flock to this place during the autumn months and it boasts some of the most beautiful colours you’ll ever see. Open year round (and just as breathtaking), the park has everything from an overnight hike to short excursions. The vast park has 6 rivers, over 400 lakes and streams and is home to 40 mammal species including the wolf.

Yukon – Grizzly Lake Trail

If you’ve got a real taste for adventure, you’ll venture north of, well, everything. Hike through the Yukon’s Tombstone Mountains, also known as “Patagonia of the North”. While the trail is more on the difficult side and can also be an overnight destination, there are shorter loops throughout that vary in difficulty depending on the type of adventure you’re looking for. This world-class mountain scenery is sure to impress even the most experienced of hikers. It’s quiet, desolate landscape is truly memorable.

We hope you’ve found a trail on this list that’s to your liking! For more information on camping, hiking trails, parking, and directions visit the Parks Canada website: https://www.pc.gc.ca

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COVE™ City Guide: Saskatoon

bubbles in saskatoon canada

While this prairie town might be overlooked when it comes to a Canadian travel destination, it shouldn’t be forgotten. The relatively small city has a population of 250,000 and boasts some of the nicest, hottest summers in Canada (and some of the coldest winters). Saskatoon has recently rebranded itself as a cycling-friendly city. From the city’s residential neighbourhoods to downtown Saskatoon and the scenic Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon is full of spaces and places to ride.


OUTDOORS

Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon

The Meewasin Trail runs over 60 km in and around Saskatoon’s city centre along both sides of the river, winding under the bridges, and through scenic landscaped parks and natural areas. Residents and visitors flock to the trail to cycle, jog, stroll or to enjoy a bit of nature in the city. Cross Country Ski trails maintained in parts of the trail through the winter.

Cranberry Flats Conservation Area, Saskatoon

Cranberry Flats is located just outside the City of Saskatoon and is a scenic area with large sandy beaches and an easy hiking trail that leads out to a valley lookout. The site is open from sunrise to sunset to enjoy the sun and sand. On warm summer days, Cranberry Flats is a popular place for Saskatoonians to launch rafts to float down the river towards Saskatoon.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

A UNESCO World Heritage site, this park is a historical center as a resource for understanding Indigenous people who originally habited the region. Wanusekewin is a Cree term for “living together in harmony”. The park contains the worlds longest-running archaeological dig where 5,000+-year-old relics are discovered daily. The center includes guided tours, hoop dancing lessons, tipi workshops and traditional art classes and visitors can walk the sacred grounds as well as rent a tipi to sleep in

FUN

Black Fox Farm

Wander through acres of blooming gladiolas and fields of flowers at the pastoral Black Fox Farm. You can pick your own bucket of flowers for a set price, and in fall, choose your Halloween pumpkin here. This family-owned farm is also one of the few farm-to-still distilleries in North America – they also make gin.

Remai Modern

Remai Modern is a new museum of modern and contemporary art in Saskatoon. The gallery’s building sits on the banks of the South Saskatchewan River, offering views of the South Saskatchewan River and prairie skies. Spanning four levels, Remai Modern has 11 gallery spaces over three floors, learning studios, a theatre, restaurant, store, lounges, play areas and numerous multi-use spaces.

FolkFest

Saskatoon’s annual summer festival is called FolkFest. The city’s multicultural communities pitch tents and showcase music and food. You’ll find a German pavilion with bratwursts, beer and accordion bands, as well as a Jamaica pavilion with reggae and cold Red Stripe and jerked chicken. This being the prairies, you’ll also find plenty of perogies and cabbage rolls and Ukrainian liqueurs.

 FOOD

Collective Coffee

Collective Coffee has two locations, one in Pleasant Hill and another in Riversdale. The design of the spaces is all about letting the natural light in with floor to ceiling windows. Sip the best coffee in town and people watch here.

Little Grouse on the Prairie

Little Grouse on the Prairie offers handmade pastas made from local wheat. Try the ravioli, perfect pasta squares stuffed with ricotta prepared simply with sage butter. The restaurant is located inside the old building of what was formerly a Canadian-Chinese restaurant.

Clementine Cafe

For brunch, try Clementine. Located in a basement that manages to feel like both a Turkish cave room and an airy loft, this packed spot its eggs with hummus, Turkish hot sauce, and housemade sourdough and tops their home fries with spicy salsa and lime mayo.

MUSTS

  • Saskatoon landmarks on both sides of the South Saskatchewan River now pay tribute to the Canadian legend Joni Mitchell. Take a trip to the plaques and hum one of her hits.
  • Buy locally grown sea buckthorn berry at the Saskatoon Farmers Market, which is open all-year-round on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

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