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Best Hiking Trails Across Canada

July 23, 2019

It’s always hiking season and as adventure seekers ourselves, we complied a list of the best hikes across Canada to conquer before the summer is over. From easy to intense, there’s a trail here for everyone. What are you waiting for? Grab a bottle of water, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover.

Alberta – Banff National Park

With one of the largest provincial parks in the country, there are over 1,600 km of trails varying intensities throughout the park – and the views are spectacular. It’s a popular tourist spot in Alberta, boasting beautiful mountain peaks, turquoise waters, and breathtaking scenery at every turn. Because there are quite a few trails, we’ve found two in varying levels of difficulty:

Easy: Lake Agnes Teahouse/Big Beehive
Time Required: 3-4 hours
Distance: 7.2 km return trip

Challenging: Cory Pass – Mt. Edith Circuit
Time Required: 5-6 hours
Distance: 13 km loop

British Columbia – The West Coast Trail, Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island’s West Coast Trail is one of the most scenic hikes in all of Canada. While it’s 75 km path weaves through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, you can take a 6-day trek or a quick hike. The trail was originally carved out to help shipwreck survivors escape from the wilderness. The trail itself offers camping if you’re looking to do the entire trek, or just enjoy an escape in the middle of the forest.

Ontario – Bruce Peninsula National Park

Bruce Peninsula National Park is home to Canada’s oldest and longest footpath spanning 750 km, running from Tobermory to Niagara Falls. The Niagara Escarpment is the backbone of the Bruce Peninsula, creating an amazing, unique landscape – it’s even part of the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. There are many hiking trails within the park, varying in all levels of difficulty and distances:

Easy: Cyprus Lake Trail
Time Required: 2.5 hours
Distance: 5km

Challenging (varies from low difficulty to moderate when approaching Grotto): Marr Lake Trail to Indian Head Cove and the Grotto
Time Required: 3 hours
Distance: 3km

Ontario – Algonquin National Park

Algonquin National Park is located approximately 3 hours from Toronto and is one and a half times the size of Price Edward Island. By saying that there is something for everyone is quite the understatement. You can take a weekend-long camping trip or hike one of the day trails within the park. If you adventure rural enough, you can spot moose grazing, bald eagle sightings, and many more. The park includes guided walks, canoeing, and birdwatching.

Newfoundland – Gros Morne National Park

Another UNESCO World Heritage site in Canada, this park offers some of the most astounding views in the country. With soaring fjords, topography and mountains, you’ll feel like you’re in Lord of The Rings – it’s Tablelands area is one of the few places in the world where you can see the Earth’s mantle. There are countless trails that are fairly easy to hike, but those seeking adventure and amazing views will take the more challenging routes in.

Quebec – Parc National de Mont-Tremblant

Canadian’s and tourists alike flock to this place during the autumn months and it boasts some of the most beautiful colours you’ll ever see. Open year round (and just as breathtaking), the park has everything from an overnight hike to short excursions. The vast park has 6 rivers, over 400 lakes and streams and is home to 40 mammal species including the wolf.

Yukon – Grizzly Lake Trail

If you’ve got a real taste for adventure, you’ll venture north of, well, everything. Hike through the Yukon’s Tombstone Mountains, also known as “Patagonia of the North”. While the trail is more on the difficult side and can also be an overnight destination, there are shorter loops throughout that vary in difficulty depending on the type of adventure you’re looking for. This world-class mountain scenery is sure to impress even the most experienced of hikers. It’s quiet, desolate landscape is truly memorable.

 

We hope you’ve found a trail on this list that’s to your liking! For more information on camping, hiking trails, parking, and directions, visit the Parks Canada website: https://www.pc.gc.ca

 

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