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10 Profound Quotes to Ponder

We all need different things to help inspire us on the toughest days. While it can be challenging to work through hard times, there is plenty of inspiration that can help lead you to be more productive.

Uplift yourself with these profound quotes that can help you think in new ways.

 

“Never to suffer would never to have been blessed.” Edgar Allan Poe

 

“The adventure of life is to learn. The purpose of life is to grow. The nature of life is to change. The challenge of life is to overcome. The essence of life is to care. The opportunity of life is to serve. The secret of life is to dare. The spice of life is to befriend. The beauty of life is to give.” – William Arthur Ward

 

“Maybe you are searching among the branches, for what only appears in the roots.” Rumi

“He who is untrue to his own cause cannot command the respect of others.” Albert Einstein

 

“If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way.” Martin Luther King Jr.

 

“Try to be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.”Maya Angelou

 

“Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.”William James

 

“No matter what people tell you, words and ideas can change the world.” – Robin Williams

 

“If you look at what you have in life, you’ll always have more. If you look at what you don’t have in life, you’ll never have enough.”Oprah Winfrey

 

“Limit your always and your nevers.”Amy Poehler

 

Inspire yourself with these profound quotes and follow our blog to discover more wellness tips to help fuel your days.

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Best Hiking Trails Across Canada

hiking trail forest

It’s always hiking season and as adventure seekers ourselves, we complied a list of the best hikes across Canada to conquer before the summer is over. From easy to intense, there’s a trail here for everyone. What are you waiting for? Grab a bottle of water, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover.


Alberta – Banff National Park

With one of the largest provincial parks in the country, there are over 1,600 km of trails varying intensities throughout the park – and the views are spectacular. It’s a popular tourist spot in Alberta, boasting beautiful mountain peaks, turquoise waters, and breathtaking scenery at every turn. Because there are quite a few trails, we’ve found two in varying levels of difficulty:

Easy: Lake Agnes Teahouse/Big Beehive
Time Required: 3-4 hours
Distance: 7.2 km return trip

Challenging: Cory Pass – Mt. Edith Circuit
Time Required: 5-6 hours
Distance: 13 km loop

British Columbia – The West Coast Trail, Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island’s West Coast Trail is one of the most scenic hikes in all of Canada. While it’s 75 km path weaves through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, you can take a 6-day trek or a quick hike. The trail was originally carved out to help shipwreck survivors escape from the wilderness. The trail itself offers camping if you’re looking to do the entire trek, or just enjoy an escape in the middle of the forest.

Ontario – Bruce Peninsula National Park

Bruce Peninsula National Park is home to Canada’s oldest and longest footpath spanning 750 km, running from Tobermory to Niagara Falls. The Niagara Escarpment is the backbone of the Bruce Peninsula, creating an amazing, unique landscape – it’s even part of the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. There are many hiking trails within the park, varying in all levels of difficulty and distances:

Easy: Cyprus Lake Trail
Time Required: 2.5 hours
Distance: 5km

Challenging (varies from low difficulty to moderate when approaching Grotto): Marr Lake Trail to Indian Head Cove and the Grotto
Time Required: 3 hours
Distance: 3km

Ontario – Algonquin National Park

Algonquin National Park is located approximately 3 hours from Toronto and is one and a half times the size of Prince Edward Island. By saying that there is something for everyone is quite an understatement. You can take a weekend-long camping trip or hike one of the day trails within the park. If you adventure rural enough, you can spot moose grazing, bald eagle sightings, and many more. The park includes guided walks, canoeing, and birdwatching.

Newfoundland – Gros Morne National Park

Another UNESCO World Heritage site in Canada, this park offers some of the most astounding views in the country. With soaring fjords, topography and mountains, you’ll feel like you’re in Lord of The Rings – it’s Tablelands area is one of the few places in the world where you can see the Earth’s mantle. There are countless trails that are fairly easy to hike, but those seeking adventure and amazing views will take the more challenging routes in.

Quebec – Parc National de Mont-Tremblant

Canadian’s and tourists alike flock to this place during the autumn months and it boasts some of the most beautiful colours you’ll ever see. Open year round (and just as breathtaking), the park has everything from an overnight hike to short excursions. The vast park has 6 rivers, over 400 lakes and streams and is home to 40 mammal species including the wolf.

Yukon – Grizzly Lake Trail

If you’ve got a real taste for adventure, you’ll venture north of, well, everything. Hike through the Yukon’s Tombstone Mountains, also known as “Patagonia of the North”. While the trail is more on the difficult side and can also be an overnight destination, there are shorter loops throughout that vary in difficulty depending on the type of adventure you’re looking for. This world-class mountain scenery is sure to impress even the most experienced of hikers. It’s quiet, desolate landscape is truly memorable.

We hope you’ve found a trail on this list that’s to your liking! For more information on camping, hiking trails, parking, and directions visit the Parks Canada website: https://www.pc.gc.ca

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COVE™ City Guide: Saskatoon

bubbles in saskatoon canada

While this prairie town might be overlooked when it comes to a Canadian travel destination, it shouldn’t be forgotten. The relatively small city has a population of 250,000 and boasts some of the nicest, hottest summers in Canada (and some of the coldest winters). Saskatoon has recently rebranded itself as a cycling-friendly city. From the city’s residential neighbourhoods to downtown Saskatoon and the scenic Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon is full of spaces and places to ride.


OUTDOORS

Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon

The Meewasin Trail runs over 60 km in and around Saskatoon’s city centre along both sides of the river, winding under the bridges, and through scenic landscaped parks and natural areas. Residents and visitors flock to the trail to cycle, jog, stroll or to enjoy a bit of nature in the city. Cross Country Ski trails maintained in parts of the trail through the winter.

Cranberry Flats Conservation Area, Saskatoon

Cranberry Flats is located just outside the City of Saskatoon and is a scenic area with large sandy beaches and an easy hiking trail that leads out to a valley lookout. The site is open from sunrise to sunset to enjoy the sun and sand. On warm summer days, Cranberry Flats is a popular place for Saskatoonians to launch rafts to float down the river towards Saskatoon.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

A UNESCO World Heritage site, this park is a historical center as a resource for understanding Indigenous people who originally habited the region. Wanusekewin is a Cree term for “living together in harmony”. The park contains the worlds longest-running archaeological dig where 5,000+-year-old relics are discovered daily. The center includes guided tours, hoop dancing lessons, tipi workshops and traditional art classes and visitors can walk the sacred grounds as well as rent a tipi to sleep in

FUN

Black Fox Farm

Wander through acres of blooming gladiolas and fields of flowers at the pastoral Black Fox Farm. You can pick your own bucket of flowers for a set price, and in fall, choose your Halloween pumpkin here. This family-owned farm is also one of the few farm-to-still distilleries in North America – they also make gin.

Remai Modern

Remai Modern is a new museum of modern and contemporary art in Saskatoon. The gallery’s building sits on the banks of the South Saskatchewan River, offering views of the South Saskatchewan River and prairie skies. Spanning four levels, Remai Modern has 11 gallery spaces over three floors, learning studios, a theatre, restaurant, store, lounges, play areas and numerous multi-use spaces.

FolkFest

Saskatoon’s annual summer festival is called FolkFest. The city’s multicultural communities pitch tents and showcase music and food. You’ll find a German pavilion with bratwursts, beer and accordion bands, as well as a Jamaica pavilion with reggae and cold Red Stripe and jerked chicken. This being the prairies, you’ll also find plenty of perogies and cabbage rolls and Ukrainian liqueurs.

 FOOD

Collective Coffee

Collective Coffee has two locations, one in Pleasant Hill and another in Riversdale. The design of the spaces is all about letting the natural light in with floor to ceiling windows. Sip the best coffee in town and people watch here.

Little Grouse on the Prairie

Little Grouse on the Prairie offers handmade pastas made from local wheat. Try the ravioli, perfect pasta squares stuffed with ricotta prepared simply with sage butter. The restaurant is located inside the old building of what was formerly a Canadian-Chinese restaurant.

Clementine Cafe

For brunch, try Clementine. Located in a basement that manages to feel like both a Turkish cave room and an airy loft, this packed spot its eggs with hummus, Turkish hot sauce, and housemade sourdough and tops their home fries with spicy salsa and lime mayo.

MUSTS

  • Saskatoon landmarks on both sides of the South Saskatchewan River now pay tribute to the Canadian legend Joni Mitchell. Take a trip to the plaques and hum one of her hits.
  • Buy locally grown sea buckthorn berry at the Saskatoon Farmers Market, which is open all-year-round on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

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The COVE™ Guide to Canadian Parks by Province

The-COVE-Guide-to-Canadian-Parks-by-Province

It’s finally hiking and camping season, and at COVE we’re ready for a summer full of adventure. We compiled a list of the best provincial and national parks in the country for you to start planning your road trip.


What is a provincial park?

Provincial parks are areas of land and water that are designated as areas of conservation, preservation, tourism, and education. The first provincial park was Queen Victoria Park in Niagara Falls and it was established in 1885. Shortly after came Algonquin in 1893, which was the first provincial park established to protect a natural environment. National parks are designated for the same reasons. They represent the power of Canada’s natural environment.

These wild places, located in every province and territory, range from mountains and plains, to boreal forests and tundra, to lakes and glaciers, and much more. National parks protect the habitats, wildlife and ecosystem diversity representative of — and sometime unique to — the natural regions.

Alberta – Banff National Park

Banff National Park is easily the province’s most popular tourist destination, as well as one of the most picturesque spots in the country. Known for its wildly coloured lakes, majestic mountains and endless opportunity for adventure, it’s Canada’s first national park. The park spans 6,641 square kilometers of scenic valleys, peaks, glaciers, forests, meadows and rivers. The actual town of Banff is uniquely located within the National Park itself.

The Park allows for camping as well as luxurious chalets and hotels. Banff National Park requires a park pass when you go to visit, and if you want to camp, you’ll have to register online.

There are tons of guided tours: mushing with dog sleds in the winter, tours via horseback, and even western-wilderness themed cookouts.

British Columbia – Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park

Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park is in the heart of the Rockies. Known for its vivid landscapes, ecosystem and of course the mountain view, it spans over 665,709 hectares of wilderness in Northern B.C. One of the notable features of the Northern Rocky Mountains Park is the diversity of water features. The area is accentuated by major rivers, clear, cold streams, waterfalls, rapids, small glaciers and lakes. While recreational use isn’t year-round, access to the area is either by hiking, boat, aircraft or horseback.

Manitoba – Atikaki Wilderness Provincial Park

One of our more rural options, Atikaki Provincial Park is where you’ll find Mother Nature at her most pristine. It’s just east of Lake Winnipeg bordering Ontario and is in Canadian Shield country – a huge area of exposed igneous rock. Bordering it is kilometers of rugged Boreal forest, rivers and lakes perfect for canoeing and fishing. There is also an abundance of wildlife, especially Caribou – Atikaki is Ojibwe for “country of the caribou”. You can stay at a fly-in lodge, chalet, or fishing base camp. The park is still truly untouched by man.

Ontario – Lake Superior Provincial Park

Located in the Northern region of Ontario along the coast of Lake Superior, this Provincial Park is one of Canada’s most notable. It’s rich in history; you’ll find pictographs littering the coast line – most of which you can see up close, and it’s one of Canada’s only accessible pictograph viewings. This park has amazing hiking trails and a stunning landscape. The park has a campground located within itself for tent, RV, trailer and cabin camping. Katherine’s Cove, a beach within the park has a breathtaking natural “bathtub” made from igneous rock and water erosion over the years. It is truly a sight to be seen.

New Brunswick – Fundy National Park

Fundy National Park is located on the Bay of Fundy, near the village of Alma. The park protects Acadian Highlands, the site of the world’s tallest tides. You can even walk on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean when the tide reaches low enough, having a chance to look at the creatures left behind. There are exclusive foliage that belong to Fundy, like the birds-eye primrose, found only in this park! If you’re looking to go camping, there are 3 campgrounds – from comfortable Otentiks to isolated primitive campgrounds, you’ll find something ideal for your group. Then, off to adventuring!

Newfoundland – Barachois Pond Provincial Park

The Barachois Pond Provincial Park occupies part of the Appalachian Mountains known as the Long Range Mountains, formed over 450 million years ago. Erosion reduced the peaks to less than 400 meters and glaciers formed the valley now filled by Barachois Pond. This park is ideal for the weekend getaway full of excitement. You can swim, fish, and go waterskiing. The Erin Mountain trail is one for the avid hiker, and boasts breathtaking views of the landscape of the Maritimes. With plenty of camping options, boat rentals, and guided tours, you’ll be sure to have a weekend of non-stop adventure.

Yukon – Kluane National Park and Reserve

In case you have a real sense of adventure, Kluane National Park and Reserve is the spot for you. The land of extreme is home to Canada’s highest mountain peak at 5,959 meters, the largest ice field and North America’s most genetically diverse grizzly population. Kluane’s known for its wilderness recreation and mountaineering – explore mountains with multi-day hikes or a more accessible adventure where great hikes await you just off the highway. You can raft the unbelievable Alsek River fed my glacial meltwaters. With tons of options for camping, exploring the Yukon is a must-do.

At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™. For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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COVE™ City Guide: Ottawa

parliament

Ottawa is so much more than the nation’s capital city. Once regarded as a sleepy home to bureaucrats, Ottawa is quickly becoming a destination for those looking for an urban adventure. Surrounded by the Rideau Canal, stunning national parks and ample national landmarks, a weekend adventure to Ottawa will not disappoint.


OUTDOORS

Gatineau Park, Gatineau

Immerse yourself in nature in Gatineau Park, the Capital’s conservation and outdoor recreation park is just 15 minutes from downtown Ottawa–Gatineau. In summer enjoy swimming, hiking, biking, camping and in winter, go cross-country skiing, snowshoeing. The Park is a sanctuary for more than 100 species of plants and animals at risk.

Commissioners Park, Ottawa

The Canadian Tulip Festival was established to celebrate the historic Royal gift of tulips from the Dutch to Canadians immediately following the Second World War as a symbol of international friendship. The Festival reserves the memorable role of the Canadian troops in the liberation of the Netherlands and Europe, as well as commemorates the birth of Dutch Princess Margriet in Ottawa during World War II—the only royal personage ever born in Canada.

Rideau Canal

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the “Canal” weaves its way through Ottawa’s quaint downtown core. The Rideau Canal is walkable and bikeable in the summer months, and you can skate the entire thing in the colder winter months. Hop on a houseboat if you feel inclined to row down its banks.

FUN

Nordik Spa-Nature

After exploring Ottawa, take a short drive over the Chelsea, Quebec and check into the Nordik Spa-Nature. Treat yourself to a massage in the spa’s tiny wood cabins amongst the hundreds of saunas. This spa is the largest of its kind in North America.

National Gallery of Canada

The National Gallery of Canada is home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of Canadian art. The massive building is host to an impressive array of works by Canadian artists, including rooms dedicated to First Nations art and modern art.

ByWard Market

ByWard Market is a buzzing hub of outdoor market stalls, specialty food shops, bars, restaurants and galleries. It’s also known for its street art and local clothing retailers. Perch on a patio for an afternoon and take time to explore this vibrant public space.

FOOD

Origin Trade Inc.

Located in the centre of the Byward Market, Origin Trade Inc. offers a selection of regional foods and beverages, which show their love of Ottawa. Origin supports local suppliers and focuses on serving the freshest products. They source foods from Ontario farms, wine from local wineries and craft beer from local breweries.

Kettleman’s Bagel Co.

Kettleman’s Bagel Co. serves Montreal-style bagels with an Ottawa twist. The bagels are served hot and fresh – and are perfect for a hearty breakfast or lunch before exploring the city. They also make a nice picnic option if you’d like to enjoy al fresco along the Canal or on the lawn of the Parliament Buildings.

Fraser Cafe

Fraser Café is an independently-owned, seasonally-focused restaurant run by brothers, Ross & Simon Fraser. Their focus is locally sourced and globally inspired dishes in a cozy setting. Fraser Café is a must for brunch on Saturdays and Sundays too.

MUSTS

  • Take a free tour of Canada’s Parliament Buildings. Time your tour to take place during Question Period to get a glimpse of MPPs and the Prime Minister debate issues of the day.
  • Eat a Beaver Tail, an Ottawa delicacy, this sugary, puffy pastry is best consumed with an extremely hot, hot chocolate or coffee. Sometimes a beavertail is the only thing that can warm one up on a cold Ottawa afternoon.
  • Skate or walk along the Canal. The Rideau Canal connects Canada’s capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, to Lake Ontario and the Saint Lawrence River at Kingston, Ontario. It’s an impressive 202 kilometres in length.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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