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COVE™ City Guide: Calgary

Calgary-city-shot

Nested between prairies and peaks, Calgary is Alberta is known as the gateway to the Rockies. The perfect springboard for mountain adventures, the energetic city has ample outdoor activities of its own. Its network of designated walking and biking paths form the most extensive urban pathway system in all North America.


Outdoors

Nose Hill Park, Calgary

Nose Hill Park is Calgary’s biggest city park located in Fish Creek is a provincial park, covering 11.27 square kilometres, the park is one of the largest urban parks in North America. It has a lush natural park with numerous hiking, biking and walking paths – many are dirt, but some are gravel or asphalt paths. This is a great location for wildlife spotting and retreat from Calgary’s bustle.

Edworthy Park, Calgary

Edworthy Park is a Calgary city park stretched along the south shore of the Bow River. Everything about this green space is big – big hills, big trees, big picnic areas, big playgrounds. The Bow River runs along the eastern edge of the park and guides the pedestrian trail. On hot days the river is a refuge for those looking to beat the heat.

Heritage Park Historical Village

Heritage Park Historical Village is a historical park in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on over 100 acres of parkland on the banks of the Glenmore Reservoir. As Canada’s second-largest living history museum, it is one of the city’s most visited tourist attractions but it’s far from a tourist trap. The village’s exhibits span Western Canadian history from the 1860s.

Fun

Calgary Stampede

The Calgary Stampede is a volunteer-supported, not-for-profit organization that preserves and celebrates Calgary’s western heritage and community spirit. The annual rodeo, exhibition, and festival held every July attracts over one million visitors per year and features one of the world’s largest rodeos.

Calgary Tower

Originally named the Husky Tower, the Calgary Tower was constructed as a joint venture between Marathon Realty and Husky Oil to commemorate Canada’s centennial and revive the downtown core as a part of a Calgary urban renewal program. Today the Tower is a major tourist destination and popular dining spot. Though it’s been eclipsed in size (cough, the CN Tower), the Tower is still a source of pride for many Calgarians.

Mt. Norquay Ski Resort

Mt. Norquay is a mountain and ski resort in Banff National Park, about 40 minutes outside of Calgary’s downtown. The ski season usually starts in early December and ends mid-April. Mount Norquay is one of three major ski resorts located in the Banff National Park and should be a winter destination for any ski lover. If skiing isn’t your thing, cozy chalets and hot toddies await as well.

Food

Juice Because

Juice Because has dozens of locations around the city and makes cold-pressed juices, nut milks and healthy snacks. They say that can cure hangover to exhaustion.

Rooftop Bar @ Simmons

Perched atop a roof the Rooftop Bar @ Simmons is a hidden gem in Calgary. Lovely panoramic views of the Bow River and delicious Mexican-inspired dishes will keep you warm if you’re visiting Calgary in the winter months. The restaurant owners promise good times to start at there – and we can’t argue with tequila.

Vintage Chop House and Tavern

No trip to Alberta would be complete without consuming a little Alberta beef. Situated in the heart of Calgary’s historic beltline neighbourhood of Victoria Park, Vintage Chophouse and Tavern has been consistently rated one of Calgary’s Best Steakhouses. Dine and indulge at this classic steakhouse however; if meat isn’t your thing, the vegetarian sides are also a mouth-watering choice.

Musts

  • Visit Inglewood, the city’s oldest neighbourhood, and a lovely area to explore as it’s lush with galleries and boutiques.
  • Take a trip up to Scotsman’s Hill, a lookout point offering pretty views of the skyscrapers and landmarks of downtown Calgary.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Calgary has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

 

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COVE™ City Guide: Saskatoon

bubbles in saskatoon canada

While this prairie town might be overlooked when it comes to a Canadian travel destination, it shouldn’t be forgotten. The relatively small city has a population of 250,000 and boasts some of the nicest, hottest summers in Canada (and some of the coldest winters). Saskatoon has recently rebranded itself as a cycling-friendly city. From the city’s residential neighbourhoods to downtown Saskatoon and the scenic Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon is full of spaces and places to ride.


OUTDOORS

Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon

The Meewasin Trail runs over 60 km in and around Saskatoon’s city centre along both sides of the river, winding under the bridges, and through scenic landscaped parks and natural areas. Residents and visitors flock to the trail to cycle, jog, stroll or to enjoy a bit of nature in the city. Cross Country Ski trails maintained in parts of the trail through the winter.

Cranberry Flats Conservation Area, Saskatoon

Cranberry Flats is located just outside the City of Saskatoon and is a scenic area with large sandy beaches and an easy hiking trail that leads out to a valley lookout. The site is open from sunrise to sunset to enjoy the sun and sand. On warm summer days, Cranberry Flats is a popular place for Saskatoonians to launch rafts to float down the river towards Saskatoon.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

A UNESCO World Heritage site, this park is a historical center as a resource for understanding Indigenous people who originally habited the region. Wanusekewin is a Cree term for “living together in harmony”. The park contains the worlds longest-running archaeological dig where 5,000+-year-old relics are discovered daily. The center includes guided tours, hoop dancing lessons, tipi workshops and traditional art classes and visitors can walk the sacred grounds as well as rent a tipi to sleep in

FUN

Black Fox Farm

Wander through acres of blooming gladiolas and fields of flowers at the pastoral Black Fox Farm. You can pick your own bucket of flowers for a set price, and in fall, choose your Halloween pumpkin here. This family-owned farm is also one of the few farm-to-still distilleries in North America – they also make gin.

Remai Modern

Remai Modern is a new museum of modern and contemporary art in Saskatoon. The gallery’s building sits on the banks of the South Saskatchewan River, offering views of the South Saskatchewan River and prairie skies. Spanning four levels, Remai Modern has 11 gallery spaces over three floors, learning studios, a theatre, restaurant, store, lounges, play areas and numerous multi-use spaces.

FolkFest

Saskatoon’s annual summer festival is called FolkFest. The city’s multicultural communities pitch tents and showcase music and food. You’ll find a German pavilion with bratwursts, beer and accordion bands, as well as a Jamaica pavilion with reggae and cold Red Stripe and jerked chicken. This being the prairies, you’ll also find plenty of perogies and cabbage rolls and Ukrainian liqueurs.

 FOOD

Collective Coffee

Collective Coffee has two locations, one in Pleasant Hill and another in Riversdale. The design of the spaces is all about letting the natural light in with floor to ceiling windows. Sip the best coffee in town and people watch here.

Little Grouse on the Prairie

Little Grouse on the Prairie offers handmade pastas made from local wheat. Try the ravioli, perfect pasta squares stuffed with ricotta prepared simply with sage butter. The restaurant is located inside the old building of what was formerly a Canadian-Chinese restaurant.

Clementine Cafe

For brunch, try Clementine. Located in a basement that manages to feel like both a Turkish cave room and an airy loft, this packed spot its eggs with hummus, Turkish hot sauce, and housemade sourdough and tops their home fries with spicy salsa and lime mayo.

MUSTS

  • Saskatoon landmarks on both sides of the South Saskatchewan River now pay tribute to the Canadian legend Joni Mitchell. Take a trip to the plaques and hum one of her hits.
  • Buy locally grown sea buckthorn berry at the Saskatoon Farmers Market, which is open all-year-round on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

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COVE™ City Guide: Ottawa

parliament

Ottawa is so much more than the nation’s capital city. Once regarded as a sleepy home to bureaucrats, Ottawa is quickly becoming a destination for those looking for an urban adventure. Surrounded by the Rideau Canal, stunning national parks and ample national landmarks, a weekend adventure to Ottawa will not disappoint.


OUTDOORS

Gatineau Park, Gatineau

Immerse yourself in nature in Gatineau Park, the Capital’s conservation and outdoor recreation park is just 15 minutes from downtown Ottawa–Gatineau. In summer enjoy swimming, hiking, biking, camping and in winter, go cross-country skiing, snowshoeing. The Park is a sanctuary for more than 100 species of plants and animals at risk.

Commissioners Park, Ottawa

The Canadian Tulip Festival was established to celebrate the historic Royal gift of tulips from the Dutch to Canadians immediately following the Second World War as a symbol of international friendship. The Festival reserves the memorable role of the Canadian troops in the liberation of the Netherlands and Europe, as well as commemorates the birth of Dutch Princess Margriet in Ottawa during World War II—the only royal personage ever born in Canada.

Rideau Canal

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the “Canal” weaves its way through Ottawa’s quaint downtown core. The Rideau Canal is walkable and bikeable in the summer months, and you can skate the entire thing in the colder winter months. Hop on a houseboat if you feel inclined to row down its banks.

FUN

Nordik Spa-Nature

After exploring Ottawa, take a short drive over the Chelsea, Quebec and check into the Nordik Spa-Nature. Treat yourself to a massage in the spa’s tiny wood cabins amongst the hundreds of saunas. This spa is the largest of its kind in North America.

National Gallery of Canada

The National Gallery of Canada is home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of Canadian art. The massive building is host to an impressive array of works by Canadian artists, including rooms dedicated to First Nations art and modern art.

ByWard Market

ByWard Market is a buzzing hub of outdoor market stalls, specialty food shops, bars, restaurants and galleries. It’s also known for its street art and local clothing retailers. Perch on a patio for an afternoon and take time to explore this vibrant public space.

FOOD

Origin Trade Inc.

Located in the centre of the Byward Market, Origin Trade Inc. offers a selection of regional foods and beverages, which show their love of Ottawa. Origin supports local suppliers and focuses on serving the freshest products. They source foods from Ontario farms, wine from local wineries and craft beer from local breweries.

Kettleman’s Bagel Co.

Kettleman’s Bagel Co. serves Montreal-style bagels with an Ottawa twist. The bagels are served hot and fresh – and are perfect for a hearty breakfast or lunch before exploring the city. They also make a nice picnic option if you’d like to enjoy al fresco along the Canal or on the lawn of the Parliament Buildings.

Fraser Cafe

Fraser Café is an independently-owned, seasonally-focused restaurant run by brothers, Ross & Simon Fraser. Their focus is locally sourced and globally inspired dishes in a cozy setting. Fraser Café is a must for brunch on Saturdays and Sundays too.

MUSTS

  • Take a free tour of Canada’s Parliament Buildings. Time your tour to take place during Question Period to get a glimpse of MPPs and the Prime Minister debate issues of the day.
  • Eat a Beaver Tail, an Ottawa delicacy, this sugary, puffy pastry is best consumed with an extremely hot, hot chocolate or coffee. Sometimes a beavertail is the only thing that can warm one up on a cold Ottawa afternoon.
  • Skate or walk along the Canal. The Rideau Canal connects Canada’s capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, to Lake Ontario and the Saint Lawrence River at Kingston, Ontario. It’s an impressive 202 kilometres in length.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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COVE™ City Guide: Halifax

nova scotia watch tower

A picture-perfect coastal destination, Halifax is an east coast capital that feels like a small town. Warm sea breezes, leafy parks, and gardens nestled between heritage buildings, are just a few reasons why you should visit. Here are some of our favourite things to do in Halifax.


Outdoors

Herring Cove Bluffs, Herring Cove Provincial Park Reserve

Just south of Halifax, The Herring Cove Bluffs is a scenic day trip. This coastal trail is 1.5km return, making it an easy hike to try when in the Halifax region. Nestled among coastal bushes and trees, these bluffs offer perfect sunset views.

Pennant Point Trail, Crystal Crescent Beach Provincial Park

This coastal provincial park features three white-sand crescent beaches along the mouth of the Halifax Harbour. Long boardwalks line the park but come prepared to do some mild bushwhacking if you want to explore the more unkempt parts of the trail. The beaches even look pretty during the off-season.

Martinique Beach Provincial Park, East Petpeswick

Martinique Beach Provincial Park is the longest sandy beach in Nova Scotia. The 5-km crescent white-sand beach has open and wooded picnic areas, sand dunes, and quiet swimming areas. The beach is close to the Halifax Surf School if you’re feeling adventurous.

The Bluff Wilderness Hiking Trail, Timberlea

This trail is located just north of Halifax and is lush with thick woodlands, with a variety of trees like red maple, spruce and oak. The wooded trail has several high peaks, allowing for stunning vistas and photos, of course.

Fun

Peggy’s Point Lighthouse, Peggy’s Cove

No trip to Halifax would be complete without an excursion to Peggy’s Cove. Quintessential and picturesque, Peggy’s Cove is a major tourist attraction, but local inhabitants still fish for lobster and the tiny community has a rustic look and feel. Get lost in downtown Peggy’s Cove and chat with friendly locals, make sure to grab ice cream at Dee Dee’s before you head back to the city.

Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Downtown Halifax

Get your pop culture fix at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. The expansive art collection is home to over 17,000 classic and modern works from native artists and showcases pieces by Maud Lewis, Nova Scotia’s beloved folk artist. It’s easy to spend a rainy afternoon here.

Food

Two if by Sea

A scenic ferry trip across the harbour sits Two if by Sea. This downtown Dartmouth café serves up massive croissants, which are well-known among Haligonians. Cozy up to locals at the communal table, and drink espresso-based beverages made with direct-trade beans roasted at neighbouring Anchored Coffee.

The Coastal Café

Buzzy brunch café, The Coastal Café, dishes out creative menu items, from bacon cheeseburger eggs Benny to the signature “Elvis”: slices of Montreal bacon, banana, and peanut butter between two buttermilk waffles. Sunday morning wait times are to be expected, as this tiny restaurant only has 20 seats – we promise the pancakes will be worth it.

Highwayman

Spanish-inspired restaurant Highwayman features an impressive menu of tapas with a focus on local seafood. Named after the Highwayman poem by Alfred Noyes, the space’s is washed in weathered, blue-grey tones. There are no reservations, so arrive early to grab a table.

Musts

  • Hike up Citadel Hill, an iconic Halifax landmark, where a cannon goes off every day at noon. This hilltop location has an incredible view of the Halifax Harbour and was chosen in 1749 as a fort location to protect the city.
  • Explore the abandoned ruin that was once the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Beaver Bank Station an hour outside of Halifax.
  • Wander in the Hydrostone Set along quaint cobblestone streets, this area is home to markets and local stores.

 

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Halifax has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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