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The COVE™ Guide to Outdoor Workouts

forest steps

Exercising outdoors is a great alternative to working out in a gym that can keep you motivated and focused on your fitness goals. There are elevated areas for finding scenic views, lush grasslands for meditation, and forests for exploring uncharted lands.


Spring

Gardening

While this might not be a traditional sport, gardening is a wellness activity that can help you burn a lot of calories. There are tough weeds to pull out or holes to dig, which makes it such a rigorous aerobic workout, but the payoff is being able to see a beautiful garden that you cultivated.

Jump Rope

Jump rope is an easy exercise that you can find an area anywhere outside to get started. The spring is also a great opportunity to mix and match jump rope with other flexible outdoor exercises like sprints, lunges, and more.

Sprints

Sprints are another exercise that does need any equipment and you can do them almost anywhere with open grassland. A football field or running track is the most logical area and gives you free rein during this season to push your body to accelerate even faster.

Summer

Kayaking

The summer season is much hotter and affords workouts that can keep you close to freshwater like kayaking. This sport is a great workout for upper body strength, and you can do it at your nearest lake.

Beach jogging

Jog along the shore with some water between your toes. This exercise is light and refreshing and can conclude with a quick dip in the water after you work up a sweat.

Basketball

Basketball is a  fundamental sport that enables you to use every part of your body. You can find a local court for a quick pick game or work on some drills that might make you a better athlete.

Fall

Hiking

The Fall season persists the warm weather but there are outdoor escapades that you can seek nearby. With some of Canada’s most beautiful natural landscapes, fall hiking is an ideal activity that comes with a scenic view. A mountain terrain, forest, or ravine are good places to get started and are perfect environments to immerse yourself in nature while you work up a sweat.

Canoeing

Canoeing is a great activity to do alone or with a partner. This paddling exercise is another workout for your upper body that comes with a bit of fun on a lake, especially during a trip to a remote cottage.

Trail running

Trail running is an on-foot experience that you want to bring a GoPro for. The elevation and cluttered forests make it a more challenging and fun workout that the woods.

Winter

Ice skating

Skating is a fun winter cardio activity you can do locally. Grab a pair of skates and head out to your nearest rink to join others in some skating events or a pick-up hockey game if you’re skilled enough.

Skiing

Heading down the slopes can be your next weekend workout venture. Skiing is fun and adventurous winter aerobics and you’ll learn to use a lot of leg power to jump, spin, and evade while moving fast. Canada has some of the most scenic winter landscapes, so this sport is great for calorie-burning with a view.

Snowshoeing

You can hike in the winter season if you choose to go snowshoeing. This activity allows you to enjoy the feeling of hiking in the woods with a bit of added difficulty. You start by grabbing a pair of snowshoes, trekking poles, and layers of clothing.

Pushing your body to new limits also means changing your habitat. With this guide, you can conquer any season and take your exercise to the great outdoors.

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COVE™ City Guide: Calgary

Calgary-city-shot

Nested between prairies and peaks, Calgary is Alberta is known as the gateway to the Rockies. The perfect springboard for mountain adventures, the energetic city has ample outdoor activities of its own. Its network of designated walking and biking paths form the most extensive urban pathway system in all North America.


Outdoors

Nose Hill Park, Calgary

Nose Hill Park is Calgary’s biggest city park located in Fish Creek is a provincial park, covering 11.27 square kilometres, the park is one of the largest urban parks in North America. It has a lush natural park with numerous hiking, biking and walking paths – many are dirt, but some are gravel or asphalt paths. This is a great location for wildlife spotting and retreat from Calgary’s bustle.

Edworthy Park, Calgary

Edworthy Park is a Calgary city park stretched along the south shore of the Bow River. Everything about this green space is big – big hills, big trees, big picnic areas, big playgrounds. The Bow River runs along the eastern edge of the park and guides the pedestrian trail. On hot days the river is a refuge for those looking to beat the heat.

Heritage Park Historical Village

Heritage Park Historical Village is a historical park in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on over 100 acres of parkland on the banks of the Glenmore Reservoir. As Canada’s second-largest living history museum, it is one of the city’s most visited tourist attractions but it’s far from a tourist trap. The village’s exhibits span Western Canadian history from the 1860s.

Fun

Calgary Stampede

The Calgary Stampede is a volunteer-supported, not-for-profit organization that preserves and celebrates Calgary’s western heritage and community spirit. The annual rodeo, exhibition, and festival held every July attracts over one million visitors per year and features one of the world’s largest rodeos.

Calgary Tower

Originally named the Husky Tower, the Calgary Tower was constructed as a joint venture between Marathon Realty and Husky Oil to commemorate Canada’s centennial and revive the downtown core as a part of a Calgary urban renewal program. Today the Tower is a major tourist destination and popular dining spot. Though it’s been eclipsed in size (cough, the CN Tower), the Tower is still a source of pride for many Calgarians.

Mt. Norquay Ski Resort

Mt. Norquay is a mountain and ski resort in Banff National Park, about 40 minutes outside of Calgary’s downtown. The ski season usually starts in early December and ends mid-April. Mount Norquay is one of three major ski resorts located in the Banff National Park and should be a winter destination for any ski lover. If skiing isn’t your thing, cozy chalets and hot toddies await as well.

Food

Juice Because

Juice Because has dozens of locations around the city and makes cold-pressed juices, nut milks and healthy snacks. They say that can cure hangover to exhaustion.

Rooftop Bar @ Simmons

Perched atop a roof the Rooftop Bar @ Simmons is a hidden gem in Calgary. Lovely panoramic views of the Bow River and delicious Mexican-inspired dishes will keep you warm if you’re visiting Calgary in the winter months. The restaurant owners promise good times to start at there – and we can’t argue with tequila.

Vintage Chop House and Tavern

No trip to Alberta would be complete without consuming a little Alberta beef. Situated in the heart of Calgary’s historic beltline neighbourhood of Victoria Park, Vintage Chophouse and Tavern has been consistently rated one of Calgary’s Best Steakhouses. Dine and indulge at this classic steakhouse however; if meat isn’t your thing, the vegetarian sides are also a mouth-watering choice.

Musts

  • Visit Inglewood, the city’s oldest neighbourhood, and a lovely area to explore as it’s lush with galleries and boutiques.
  • Take a trip up to Scotsman’s Hill, a lookout point offering pretty views of the skyscrapers and landmarks of downtown Calgary.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Calgary has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

 

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Best Hiking Trails Across Canada

hiking trail forest

It’s always hiking season and as adventure seekers ourselves, we complied a list of the best hikes across Canada to conquer before the summer is over. From easy to intense, there’s a trail here for everyone. What are you waiting for? Grab a bottle of water, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover.


Alberta – Banff National Park

With one of the largest provincial parks in the country, there are over 1,600 km of trails varying intensities throughout the park – and the views are spectacular. It’s a popular tourist spot in Alberta, boasting beautiful mountain peaks, turquoise waters, and breathtaking scenery at every turn. Because there are quite a few trails, we’ve found two in varying levels of difficulty:

Easy: Lake Agnes Teahouse/Big Beehive
Time Required: 3-4 hours
Distance: 7.2 km return trip

Challenging: Cory Pass – Mt. Edith Circuit
Time Required: 5-6 hours
Distance: 13 km loop

British Columbia – The West Coast Trail, Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island’s West Coast Trail is one of the most scenic hikes in all of Canada. While it’s 75 km path weaves through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, you can take a 6-day trek or a quick hike. The trail was originally carved out to help shipwreck survivors escape from the wilderness. The trail itself offers camping if you’re looking to do the entire trek, or just enjoy an escape in the middle of the forest.

Ontario – Bruce Peninsula National Park

Bruce Peninsula National Park is home to Canada’s oldest and longest footpath spanning 750 km, running from Tobermory to Niagara Falls. The Niagara Escarpment is the backbone of the Bruce Peninsula, creating an amazing, unique landscape – it’s even part of the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. There are many hiking trails within the park, varying in all levels of difficulty and distances:

Easy: Cyprus Lake Trail
Time Required: 2.5 hours
Distance: 5km

Challenging (varies from low difficulty to moderate when approaching Grotto): Marr Lake Trail to Indian Head Cove and the Grotto
Time Required: 3 hours
Distance: 3km

Ontario – Algonquin National Park

Algonquin National Park is located approximately 3 hours from Toronto and is one and a half times the size of Prince Edward Island. By saying that there is something for everyone is quite an understatement. You can take a weekend-long camping trip or hike one of the day trails within the park. If you adventure rural enough, you can spot moose grazing, bald eagle sightings, and many more. The park includes guided walks, canoeing, and birdwatching.

Newfoundland – Gros Morne National Park

Another UNESCO World Heritage site in Canada, this park offers some of the most astounding views in the country. With soaring fjords, topography and mountains, you’ll feel like you’re in Lord of The Rings – it’s Tablelands area is one of the few places in the world where you can see the Earth’s mantle. There are countless trails that are fairly easy to hike, but those seeking adventure and amazing views will take the more challenging routes in.

Quebec – Parc National de Mont-Tremblant

Canadian’s and tourists alike flock to this place during the autumn months and it boasts some of the most beautiful colours you’ll ever see. Open year round (and just as breathtaking), the park has everything from an overnight hike to short excursions. The vast park has 6 rivers, over 400 lakes and streams and is home to 40 mammal species including the wolf.

Yukon – Grizzly Lake Trail

If you’ve got a real taste for adventure, you’ll venture north of, well, everything. Hike through the Yukon’s Tombstone Mountains, also known as “Patagonia of the North”. While the trail is more on the difficult side and can also be an overnight destination, there are shorter loops throughout that vary in difficulty depending on the type of adventure you’re looking for. This world-class mountain scenery is sure to impress even the most experienced of hikers. It’s quiet, desolate landscape is truly memorable.

We hope you’ve found a trail on this list that’s to your liking! For more information on camping, hiking trails, parking, and directions visit the Parks Canada website: https://www.pc.gc.ca

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The COVE™ Guide to Canadian Parks by Province

The-COVE-Guide-to-Canadian-Parks-by-Province

It’s finally hiking and camping season, and at COVE we’re ready for a summer full of adventure. We compiled a list of the best provincial and national parks in the country for you to start planning your road trip.


What is a provincial park?

Provincial parks are areas of land and water that are designated as areas of conservation, preservation, tourism, and education. The first provincial park was Queen Victoria Park in Niagara Falls and it was established in 1885. Shortly after came Algonquin in 1893, which was the first provincial park established to protect a natural environment. National parks are designated for the same reasons. They represent the power of Canada’s natural environment.

These wild places, located in every province and territory, range from mountains and plains, to boreal forests and tundra, to lakes and glaciers, and much more. National parks protect the habitats, wildlife and ecosystem diversity representative of — and sometime unique to — the natural regions.

Alberta – Banff National Park

Banff National Park is easily the province’s most popular tourist destination, as well as one of the most picturesque spots in the country. Known for its wildly coloured lakes, majestic mountains and endless opportunity for adventure, it’s Canada’s first national park. The park spans 6,641 square kilometers of scenic valleys, peaks, glaciers, forests, meadows and rivers. The actual town of Banff is uniquely located within the National Park itself.

The Park allows for camping as well as luxurious chalets and hotels. Banff National Park requires a park pass when you go to visit, and if you want to camp, you’ll have to register online.

There are tons of guided tours: mushing with dog sleds in the winter, tours via horseback, and even western-wilderness themed cookouts.

British Columbia – Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park

Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park is in the heart of the Rockies. Known for its vivid landscapes, ecosystem and of course the mountain view, it spans over 665,709 hectares of wilderness in Northern B.C. One of the notable features of the Northern Rocky Mountains Park is the diversity of water features. The area is accentuated by major rivers, clear, cold streams, waterfalls, rapids, small glaciers and lakes. While recreational use isn’t year-round, access to the area is either by hiking, boat, aircraft or horseback.

Manitoba – Atikaki Wilderness Provincial Park

One of our more rural options, Atikaki Provincial Park is where you’ll find Mother Nature at her most pristine. It’s just east of Lake Winnipeg bordering Ontario and is in Canadian Shield country – a huge area of exposed igneous rock. Bordering it is kilometers of rugged Boreal forest, rivers and lakes perfect for canoeing and fishing. There is also an abundance of wildlife, especially Caribou – Atikaki is Ojibwe for “country of the caribou”. You can stay at a fly-in lodge, chalet, or fishing base camp. The park is still truly untouched by man.

Ontario – Lake Superior Provincial Park

Located in the Northern region of Ontario along the coast of Lake Superior, this Provincial Park is one of Canada’s most notable. It’s rich in history; you’ll find pictographs littering the coast line – most of which you can see up close, and it’s one of Canada’s only accessible pictograph viewings. This park has amazing hiking trails and a stunning landscape. The park has a campground located within itself for tent, RV, trailer and cabin camping. Katherine’s Cove, a beach within the park has a breathtaking natural “bathtub” made from igneous rock and water erosion over the years. It is truly a sight to be seen.

New Brunswick – Fundy National Park

Fundy National Park is located on the Bay of Fundy, near the village of Alma. The park protects Acadian Highlands, the site of the world’s tallest tides. You can even walk on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean when the tide reaches low enough, having a chance to look at the creatures left behind. There are exclusive foliage that belong to Fundy, like the birds-eye primrose, found only in this park! If you’re looking to go camping, there are 3 campgrounds – from comfortable Otentiks to isolated primitive campgrounds, you’ll find something ideal for your group. Then, off to adventuring!

Newfoundland – Barachois Pond Provincial Park

The Barachois Pond Provincial Park occupies part of the Appalachian Mountains known as the Long Range Mountains, formed over 450 million years ago. Erosion reduced the peaks to less than 400 meters and glaciers formed the valley now filled by Barachois Pond. This park is ideal for the weekend getaway full of excitement. You can swim, fish, and go waterskiing. The Erin Mountain trail is one for the avid hiker, and boasts breathtaking views of the landscape of the Maritimes. With plenty of camping options, boat rentals, and guided tours, you’ll be sure to have a weekend of non-stop adventure.

Yukon – Kluane National Park and Reserve

In case you have a real sense of adventure, Kluane National Park and Reserve is the spot for you. The land of extreme is home to Canada’s highest mountain peak at 5,959 meters, the largest ice field and North America’s most genetically diverse grizzly population. Kluane’s known for its wilderness recreation and mountaineering – explore mountains with multi-day hikes or a more accessible adventure where great hikes await you just off the highway. You can raft the unbelievable Alsek River fed my glacial meltwaters. With tons of options for camping, exploring the Yukon is a must-do.

At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™. For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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