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The COVE™ Guide to Outdoor Workouts

forest steps

Exercising outdoors is a great alternative to working out in a gym that can keep you motivated and focused on your fitness goals. There are elevated areas for finding scenic views, lush grasslands for meditation, and forests for exploring uncharted lands.


Spring

Gardening

While this might not be a traditional sport, gardening is a wellness activity that can help you burn a lot of calories. There are tough weeds to pull out or holes to dig, which makes it such a rigorous aerobic workout, but the payoff is being able to see a beautiful garden that you cultivated.

Jump Rope

Jump rope is an easy exercise that you can find an area anywhere outside to get started. The spring is also a great opportunity to mix and match jump rope with other flexible outdoor exercises like sprints, lunges, and more.

Sprints

Sprints are another exercise that does need any equipment and you can do them almost anywhere with open grassland. A football field or running track is the most logical area and gives you free rein during this season to push your body to accelerate even faster.

Summer

Kayaking

The summer season is much hotter and affords workouts that can keep you close to freshwater like kayaking. This sport is a great workout for upper body strength, and you can do it at your nearest lake.

Beach jogging

Jog along the shore with some water between your toes. This exercise is light and refreshing and can conclude with a quick dip in the water after you work up a sweat.

Basketball

Basketball is a  fundamental sport that enables you to use every part of your body. You can find a local court for a quick pick game or work on some drills that might make you a better athlete.

Fall

Hiking

The Fall season persists the warm weather but there are outdoor escapades that you can seek nearby. With some of Canada’s most beautiful natural landscapes, fall hiking is an ideal activity that comes with a scenic view. A mountain terrain, forest, or ravine are good places to get started and are perfect environments to immerse yourself in nature while you work up a sweat.

Canoeing

Canoeing is a great activity to do alone or with a partner. This paddling exercise is another workout for your upper body that comes with a bit of fun on a lake, especially during a trip to a remote cottage.

Trail running

Trail running is an on-foot experience that you want to bring a GoPro for. The elevation and cluttered forests make it a more challenging and fun workout that the woods.

Winter

Ice skating

Skating is a fun winter cardio activity you can do locally. Grab a pair of skates and head out to your nearest rink to join others in some skating events or a pick-up hockey game if you’re skilled enough.

Skiing

Heading down the slopes can be your next weekend workout venture. Skiing is fun and adventurous winter aerobics and you’ll learn to use a lot of leg power to jump, spin, and evade while moving fast. Canada has some of the most scenic winter landscapes, so this sport is great for calorie-burning with a view.

Snowshoeing

You can hike in the winter season if you choose to go snowshoeing. This activity allows you to enjoy the feeling of hiking in the woods with a bit of added difficulty. You start by grabbing a pair of snowshoes, trekking poles, and layers of clothing.

Pushing your body to new limits also means changing your habitat. With this guide, you can conquer any season and take your exercise to the great outdoors.

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Glamping in Canada: The COVE™ Approved Guide to Camping 

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Cottages and outdoor living spaces in Canada have evolved over the past few years with a higher quality of living. The idea of staying at a hotel in a new city is comforting,  but what if you could bring the same hotel comfort to the outdoors?


Thankfully with options like glamping, camping in a glamorous fashion, you can combine both these lifestyles into one wildlife venture. Let us walk you through our The CoveTM Approved Guide to Camping in Style.

Kissimmee near East Lake Tohopekaliga

This treehouse is prime outdoor glamping for couples looking for a small getaway in the woods. The house is built like a bungalow and is equipped with most of your household needs. The space is located in Kissimmee, one of Florida’s scenic counties located south of Orlando. The area is a home situated between lush wildlife and big-city amenities.

Solar Powered Toronto Treehouse

This unique treehouse is a fairly spacious small home that sits atop a steep hill in Blackstock, Ontario. This quiet dwelling has enough room for two people and is great for a romantic getaway from city life to peacefully reflect in nature. The treehouse can produce enough electricity for the whole home thanks to its solar panels.

Yurt Rental in Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada

Algonquin Park has a lot of space for roaming and discovering wildlife. This unique yurt is located in the park’s 600-acre land and is a haven for outdoor activities like fishing in the Amable du Fond River or watching the roaming buffalo. The walls are made out of two layers of wool, which s enough to heat the space during harsh Canadian winters. You can also cook hot meals within the yurt thanks to the wooden stove.

Dome Rental in the Forest of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia

A geodome is an easy solution to finding high-quality outdoor lodging with hotel-like standards of living. Nestled in Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, this convenient dome rental offers a home that is eco-friendly with a panoramic view. Despite its size in comparison to the other homes on the list, this dome is surprisingly equipped with a more healthy balance of amenities than most. The area also features many outdoor recreational activities with White Point, Meat Cove, and Bay Saint Lawrence all nearby.

Cozy Tipi with a Hot Tub and a Sauna in Markdale, Ontario

A tipi is one of the simpler homes on this list, but its simplicity also makes it the most intimate. These small cone-shaped dwellings don’t come equipped with any electronics, outlets, or appliances, which is great for unplugging from the outside world and truly connecting with your loved one through some wholesome outdoor activities. This location features spaces with an indoor fire pit nestled in the middle for warmth during the colder seasons. You can escape your tent any time and enjoy kayaking, fishing, canoeing, and more. The area also features many trails and game fields close by.

Bright Tiny House near Belleville, Ontario

This red tiny house is the perfect opportunity to take a bit of your city lifestyle into a rural weekend getaway. Situated near Belleville, Ontario, this space comes with beautiful countryside scenery and local parks near the area.  The house provides quite a few amenities that allow you to feel more at home as well. There is a downstairs seating area with bright windows, which are great for reading or watching the sunrise. The homeowner also provides many small appliances including, a hot plate, WIFI, oven, fridge and more.

Unique and Efficient Cabin Rental with Private Porch in Ontario, Canada

These small cabin rentals are a great escape for glampers looking to spend most of their getaway outdoors instead of inside. The area covers 89 acres in Ottawa Valley, Ontario and is close to the Ottawa Valley River. You can enjoy a variety of water sports on the private beach like kayaking, canoeing or paddle boating.

Secluded Glamping Tent Rental in the Laurentian Mountains of Mattawa, Ontario

This glamping tent is the perfect opportunity for a couple looking for seclusion and camping more traditionally. Located in the Laurentian Mountains of Mattawa, Ontario, this form of lodging covers most of your camping essentials with a wood-burning stove for heat, composting toilet, and spring-fed well for your water supply.

Secluded Cabin Rental in Golden Lake, Ontario

This wooden cabin in Golden Lake, Ontario gives you the conventional cottage lifestyle with all your outdoor fun in a remote setting. The decor of the cabin includes furniture made entirely from local cedar and features a campfire pit in the backyard, optimal for late-night cozy settings. The cabin also comes with a complimentary canoe with a beach approximately 5km away. You also have the opportunity to explore the wetlands surrounding the area including the nearby Bonnechere River Valley.

The outdoors offers a lot to explore and our guide is only an introduction to what you can uncover. For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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Best Hiking Trails Across Canada

hiking trail forest

It’s always hiking season and as adventure seekers ourselves, we complied a list of the best hikes across Canada to conquer before the summer is over. From easy to intense, there’s a trail here for everyone. What are you waiting for? Grab a bottle of water, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover.


Alberta – Banff National Park

With one of the largest provincial parks in the country, there are over 1,600 km of trails varying intensities throughout the park – and the views are spectacular. It’s a popular tourist spot in Alberta, boasting beautiful mountain peaks, turquoise waters, and breathtaking scenery at every turn. Because there are quite a few trails, we’ve found two in varying levels of difficulty:

Easy: Lake Agnes Teahouse/Big Beehive
Time Required: 3-4 hours
Distance: 7.2 km return trip

Challenging: Cory Pass – Mt. Edith Circuit
Time Required: 5-6 hours
Distance: 13 km loop

British Columbia – The West Coast Trail, Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island’s West Coast Trail is one of the most scenic hikes in all of Canada. While it’s 75 km path weaves through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, you can take a 6-day trek or a quick hike. The trail was originally carved out to help shipwreck survivors escape from the wilderness. The trail itself offers camping if you’re looking to do the entire trek, or just enjoy an escape in the middle of the forest.

Ontario – Bruce Peninsula National Park

Bruce Peninsula National Park is home to Canada’s oldest and longest footpath spanning 750 km, running from Tobermory to Niagara Falls. The Niagara Escarpment is the backbone of the Bruce Peninsula, creating an amazing, unique landscape – it’s even part of the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. There are many hiking trails within the park, varying in all levels of difficulty and distances:

Easy: Cyprus Lake Trail
Time Required: 2.5 hours
Distance: 5km

Challenging (varies from low difficulty to moderate when approaching Grotto): Marr Lake Trail to Indian Head Cove and the Grotto
Time Required: 3 hours
Distance: 3km

Ontario – Algonquin National Park

Algonquin National Park is located approximately 3 hours from Toronto and is one and a half times the size of Prince Edward Island. By saying that there is something for everyone is quite an understatement. You can take a weekend-long camping trip or hike one of the day trails within the park. If you adventure rural enough, you can spot moose grazing, bald eagle sightings, and many more. The park includes guided walks, canoeing, and birdwatching.

Newfoundland – Gros Morne National Park

Another UNESCO World Heritage site in Canada, this park offers some of the most astounding views in the country. With soaring fjords, topography and mountains, you’ll feel like you’re in Lord of The Rings – it’s Tablelands area is one of the few places in the world where you can see the Earth’s mantle. There are countless trails that are fairly easy to hike, but those seeking adventure and amazing views will take the more challenging routes in.

Quebec – Parc National de Mont-Tremblant

Canadian’s and tourists alike flock to this place during the autumn months and it boasts some of the most beautiful colours you’ll ever see. Open year round (and just as breathtaking), the park has everything from an overnight hike to short excursions. The vast park has 6 rivers, over 400 lakes and streams and is home to 40 mammal species including the wolf.

Yukon – Grizzly Lake Trail

If you’ve got a real taste for adventure, you’ll venture north of, well, everything. Hike through the Yukon’s Tombstone Mountains, also known as “Patagonia of the North”. While the trail is more on the difficult side and can also be an overnight destination, there are shorter loops throughout that vary in difficulty depending on the type of adventure you’re looking for. This world-class mountain scenery is sure to impress even the most experienced of hikers. It’s quiet, desolate landscape is truly memorable.

We hope you’ve found a trail on this list that’s to your liking! For more information on camping, hiking trails, parking, and directions visit the Parks Canada website: https://www.pc.gc.ca

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COVE™ City Guide: Saskatoon

bubbles in saskatoon canada

While this prairie town might be overlooked when it comes to a Canadian travel destination, it shouldn’t be forgotten. The relatively small city has a population of 250,000 and boasts some of the nicest, hottest summers in Canada (and some of the coldest winters). Saskatoon has recently rebranded itself as a cycling-friendly city. From the city’s residential neighbourhoods to downtown Saskatoon and the scenic Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon is full of spaces and places to ride.


OUTDOORS

Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatoon

The Meewasin Trail runs over 60 km in and around Saskatoon’s city centre along both sides of the river, winding under the bridges, and through scenic landscaped parks and natural areas. Residents and visitors flock to the trail to cycle, jog, stroll or to enjoy a bit of nature in the city. Cross Country Ski trails maintained in parts of the trail through the winter.

Cranberry Flats Conservation Area, Saskatoon

Cranberry Flats is located just outside the City of Saskatoon and is a scenic area with large sandy beaches and an easy hiking trail that leads out to a valley lookout. The site is open from sunrise to sunset to enjoy the sun and sand. On warm summer days, Cranberry Flats is a popular place for Saskatoonians to launch rafts to float down the river towards Saskatoon.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

A UNESCO World Heritage site, this park is a historical center as a resource for understanding Indigenous people who originally habited the region. Wanusekewin is a Cree term for “living together in harmony”. The park contains the worlds longest-running archaeological dig where 5,000+-year-old relics are discovered daily. The center includes guided tours, hoop dancing lessons, tipi workshops and traditional art classes and visitors can walk the sacred grounds as well as rent a tipi to sleep in

FUN

Black Fox Farm

Wander through acres of blooming gladiolas and fields of flowers at the pastoral Black Fox Farm. You can pick your own bucket of flowers for a set price, and in fall, choose your Halloween pumpkin here. This family-owned farm is also one of the few farm-to-still distilleries in North America – they also make gin.

Remai Modern

Remai Modern is a new museum of modern and contemporary art in Saskatoon. The gallery’s building sits on the banks of the South Saskatchewan River, offering views of the South Saskatchewan River and prairie skies. Spanning four levels, Remai Modern has 11 gallery spaces over three floors, learning studios, a theatre, restaurant, store, lounges, play areas and numerous multi-use spaces.

FolkFest

Saskatoon’s annual summer festival is called FolkFest. The city’s multicultural communities pitch tents and showcase music and food. You’ll find a German pavilion with bratwursts, beer and accordion bands, as well as a Jamaica pavilion with reggae and cold Red Stripe and jerked chicken. This being the prairies, you’ll also find plenty of perogies and cabbage rolls and Ukrainian liqueurs.

 FOOD

Collective Coffee

Collective Coffee has two locations, one in Pleasant Hill and another in Riversdale. The design of the spaces is all about letting the natural light in with floor to ceiling windows. Sip the best coffee in town and people watch here.

Little Grouse on the Prairie

Little Grouse on the Prairie offers handmade pastas made from local wheat. Try the ravioli, perfect pasta squares stuffed with ricotta prepared simply with sage butter. The restaurant is located inside the old building of what was formerly a Canadian-Chinese restaurant.

Clementine Cafe

For brunch, try Clementine. Located in a basement that manages to feel like both a Turkish cave room and an airy loft, this packed spot its eggs with hummus, Turkish hot sauce, and housemade sourdough and tops their home fries with spicy salsa and lime mayo.

MUSTS

  • Saskatoon landmarks on both sides of the South Saskatchewan River now pay tribute to the Canadian legend Joni Mitchell. Take a trip to the plaques and hum one of her hits.
  • Buy locally grown sea buckthorn berry at the Saskatoon Farmers Market, which is open all-year-round on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

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COVE™ City Guide: Ottawa

parliament

Ottawa is so much more than the nation’s capital city. Once regarded as a sleepy home to bureaucrats, Ottawa is quickly becoming a destination for those looking for an urban adventure. Surrounded by the Rideau Canal, stunning national parks and ample national landmarks, a weekend adventure to Ottawa will not disappoint.


OUTDOORS

Gatineau Park, Gatineau

Immerse yourself in nature in Gatineau Park, the Capital’s conservation and outdoor recreation park is just 15 minutes from downtown Ottawa–Gatineau. In summer enjoy swimming, hiking, biking, camping and in winter, go cross-country skiing, snowshoeing. The Park is a sanctuary for more than 100 species of plants and animals at risk.

Commissioners Park, Ottawa

The Canadian Tulip Festival was established to celebrate the historic Royal gift of tulips from the Dutch to Canadians immediately following the Second World War as a symbol of international friendship. The Festival reserves the memorable role of the Canadian troops in the liberation of the Netherlands and Europe, as well as commemorates the birth of Dutch Princess Margriet in Ottawa during World War II—the only royal personage ever born in Canada.

Rideau Canal

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the “Canal” weaves its way through Ottawa’s quaint downtown core. The Rideau Canal is walkable and bikeable in the summer months, and you can skate the entire thing in the colder winter months. Hop on a houseboat if you feel inclined to row down its banks.

FUN

Nordik Spa-Nature

After exploring Ottawa, take a short drive over the Chelsea, Quebec and check into the Nordik Spa-Nature. Treat yourself to a massage in the spa’s tiny wood cabins amongst the hundreds of saunas. This spa is the largest of its kind in North America.

National Gallery of Canada

The National Gallery of Canada is home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of Canadian art. The massive building is host to an impressive array of works by Canadian artists, including rooms dedicated to First Nations art and modern art.

ByWard Market

ByWard Market is a buzzing hub of outdoor market stalls, specialty food shops, bars, restaurants and galleries. It’s also known for its street art and local clothing retailers. Perch on a patio for an afternoon and take time to explore this vibrant public space.

FOOD

Origin Trade Inc.

Located in the centre of the Byward Market, Origin Trade Inc. offers a selection of regional foods and beverages, which show their love of Ottawa. Origin supports local suppliers and focuses on serving the freshest products. They source foods from Ontario farms, wine from local wineries and craft beer from local breweries.

Kettleman’s Bagel Co.

Kettleman’s Bagel Co. serves Montreal-style bagels with an Ottawa twist. The bagels are served hot and fresh – and are perfect for a hearty breakfast or lunch before exploring the city. They also make a nice picnic option if you’d like to enjoy al fresco along the Canal or on the lawn of the Parliament Buildings.

Fraser Cafe

Fraser Café is an independently-owned, seasonally-focused restaurant run by brothers, Ross & Simon Fraser. Their focus is locally sourced and globally inspired dishes in a cozy setting. Fraser Café is a must for brunch on Saturdays and Sundays too.

MUSTS

  • Take a free tour of Canada’s Parliament Buildings. Time your tour to take place during Question Period to get a glimpse of MPPs and the Prime Minister debate issues of the day.
  • Eat a Beaver Tail, an Ottawa delicacy, this sugary, puffy pastry is best consumed with an extremely hot, hot chocolate or coffee. Sometimes a beavertail is the only thing that can warm one up on a cold Ottawa afternoon.
  • Skate or walk along the Canal. The Rideau Canal connects Canada’s capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, to Lake Ontario and the Saint Lawrence River at Kingston, Ontario. It’s an impressive 202 kilometres in length.

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Ottawa has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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COVE™ City Guide: Halifax

nova scotia watch tower

A picture-perfect coastal destination, Halifax is an east coast capital that feels like a small town. Warm sea breezes, leafy parks, and gardens nestled between heritage buildings, are just a few reasons why you should visit. Here are some of our favourite things to do in Halifax.


Outdoors

Herring Cove Bluffs, Herring Cove Provincial Park Reserve

Just south of Halifax, The Herring Cove Bluffs is a scenic day trip. This coastal trail is 1.5km return, making it an easy hike to try when in the Halifax region. Nestled among coastal bushes and trees, these bluffs offer perfect sunset views.

Pennant Point Trail, Crystal Crescent Beach Provincial Park

This coastal provincial park features three white-sand crescent beaches along the mouth of the Halifax Harbour. Long boardwalks line the park but come prepared to do some mild bushwhacking if you want to explore the more unkempt parts of the trail. The beaches even look pretty during the off-season.

Martinique Beach Provincial Park, East Petpeswick

Martinique Beach Provincial Park is the longest sandy beach in Nova Scotia. The 5-km crescent white-sand beach has open and wooded picnic areas, sand dunes, and quiet swimming areas. The beach is close to the Halifax Surf School if you’re feeling adventurous.

The Bluff Wilderness Hiking Trail, Timberlea

This trail is located just north of Halifax and is lush with thick woodlands, with a variety of trees like red maple, spruce and oak. The wooded trail has several high peaks, allowing for stunning vistas and photos, of course.

Fun

Peggy’s Point Lighthouse, Peggy’s Cove

No trip to Halifax would be complete without an excursion to Peggy’s Cove. Quintessential and picturesque, Peggy’s Cove is a major tourist attraction, but local inhabitants still fish for lobster and the tiny community has a rustic look and feel. Get lost in downtown Peggy’s Cove and chat with friendly locals, make sure to grab ice cream at Dee Dee’s before you head back to the city.

Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Downtown Halifax

Get your pop culture fix at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. The expansive art collection is home to over 17,000 classic and modern works from native artists and showcases pieces by Maud Lewis, Nova Scotia’s beloved folk artist. It’s easy to spend a rainy afternoon here.

Food

Two if by Sea

A scenic ferry trip across the harbour sits Two if by Sea. This downtown Dartmouth café serves up massive croissants, which are well-known among Haligonians. Cozy up to locals at the communal table, and drink espresso-based beverages made with direct-trade beans roasted at neighbouring Anchored Coffee.

The Coastal Café

Buzzy brunch café, The Coastal Café, dishes out creative menu items, from bacon cheeseburger eggs Benny to the signature “Elvis”: slices of Montreal bacon, banana, and peanut butter between two buttermilk waffles. Sunday morning wait times are to be expected, as this tiny restaurant only has 20 seats – we promise the pancakes will be worth it.

Highwayman

Spanish-inspired restaurant Highwayman features an impressive menu of tapas with a focus on local seafood. Named after the Highwayman poem by Alfred Noyes, the space’s is washed in weathered, blue-grey tones. There are no reservations, so arrive early to grab a table.

Musts

  • Hike up Citadel Hill, an iconic Halifax landmark, where a cannon goes off every day at noon. This hilltop location has an incredible view of the Halifax Harbour and was chosen in 1749 as a fort location to protect the city.
  • Explore the abandoned ruin that was once the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Beaver Bank Station an hour outside of Halifax.
  • Wander in the Hydrostone Set along quaint cobblestone streets, this area is home to markets and local stores.

 

This list is just the start, we hope you explore all Halifax has to offer and discover more. At COVE™ our goal is to Make Each Experience a Discovery ™.

For more information, check out covecannabis.ca or follow us on social @covecrafted.

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